How do you take care of grape plants

How do you take care of grape plants


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How do you take care of grape plants?

This grape is very healthy looking but is it just a grape plant?

A:

Your grape looks very healthy - generally healthy plant will have healthy foliage, buds and grapes. If you pull the grapes off it will give you a better idea if there are any pests, disease etc. If there are any pests, spraying with soapy water, or if there is disease, you will be able to see it on the foliage.

If there is no pest/disease problem, you can also treat the plant to encourage more fruit, you can pot up the plant and provide more light/water. If you do this, you should be able to expect about 5 more weeks growth in the springtime. Then the plant can be moved to a location that suits it better, and you'll want to pinch the leaf tips off at that point, or cut them off completely and let the plant settle into a more robust state.

You can use a trimmer and save the cuttings. You could also use the vine or canes as food, e.g. grapes.

What type of soil do you have your grape growing in? If it is well-drained soil with humus and adequate fertilizer, then the plant should be in good health.

I'm not suggesting that your plant is not healthy, but the best thing to do would be to have it examined by a local garden center, or other such establishment. I'm sorry to say this, but the last thing you want is the suggestion of a nutrition problem.

A:

Depends how big is it, but if it is a relatively small plant, you should be able to get some grapes out of it this year.

The plant is supposed to be a small bush and not a vine, and some varieties are pretty fragile, you might want to let some branches grow through your other flowers.

Take care of it, trim it, so it can focus more on growing grapes. The size you see is the actual size of the root ball. You might need to move it around to get enough water and light.

If it is still going to produce green fruits, it should keep producing for 2 more weeks.

You can mulch it with straw or mulch at least 50-100cm away from it. You can also feed it, but since you don't have fruits yet, it will have to wait.

Source: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/how-to-grow-grapes.html

Source: http://www.whatisthankhome.com/how-to-grow-grapes/

A:

Grapes are succulents (although not the most water-efficient variety). As a result, you should be able to just let them grow on their own for a few years before you need to remove them. Eventually you'll see that your plant will no longer grow, and you can trim it back or pull it to the ground to make way for a new plant.

"Grow your own grapes and enjoy them, right now or later." -Home and Garden by the Cooperative Extension Service.

There are also grapes that you can buy that are already started and ready to pick. From what I understand, they're great for a dessert wine, but I'm not sure you can find them at any of the more common retailers. Some of these are going to be made with already ripe grapes (but hopefully you don't have that kind of investment right now!)

Source - http://www.cnair.org/SelectionOfGrape.aspx

You can also trim the plant back, and you can use the cuttings as food. If you get cuttings off a vine, you don't necessarily have to have it start producing grapes, you can grow it until it becomes a bush like a grapevine, then remove the stems and let them grow into bushes.

Source - http://www.chicagoflower.org/new_toys/grapes.htm

Grapes are one of the easiest plants to propagate. They have shallow roots, which are easily covered with the right soil, and when there are shoots present, they have a tendency to produce a cluster of seedlings.

Source - http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/cultivation/grow-grapes-indoors.htm

Otherwise, your plant should be fine, but it may be tempting to cut it down to a few inches to make space for a newer one. Just be careful to keep it watered, if possible, and you should be fine.

Source - http://nontmghome.blogs.com/legume-love/2013/09/grapes-good-for-spring.html

Source - http://thegardeningexpert.com/community/horticulture/grapes/article/96

The world of growing grapes is incredibly expansive, but the above pages should be sufficient to get you started. :)

Source - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0VJ0pdTTtA

Some useful links:

http://www.not-that-gardening.com/GrowGrapes/Grapes

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/pests-and-diseases/grape-growers-handbook



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